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Michigan Journal of Medicine

University of Michigan

Spotlight on Student Research

This page intends to highlight the strong and diverse array of research projects being performed by our medical students. The University of Michigan Medical School fosters a culture of creativity and discovery, and the faculty are deeply supportive of medical students' academic endeavors. At MJM, our goal is to further strengthen the student research community at the medical school by teaching medical editing and writing. We also aim to provide students with recognition for their research efforts through various outlets, such as this page, as well as publication in our journal.

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David Cron
Co-Editor-in-Chief, MJM
Class of 2018
David is a 4th year medical student and the co-Editor-in-Chief of MJM. My research addresses the role of surgeons in the opioid epidemic, and we are working to promote safe opioid prescribing after surgery. I became interested in this topic at the start of medical school, when I sought a way to combine my passion for fighting the opioid epidemic with my interest in surgical outcomes research. I am studying the implications of preoperative chronic opioid use on surgical outcomes, and I am studying patterns of postoperative opioid prescribing and prolonged opioid use after surgery. The majority of opioids prescribed for postoperative pain remain unused, and this creates potential for these opioids to be diverted to the community. We are creating guidelines to inform postoperative opioid prescription sizes in order to reduce excess opioid prescribing after surgery. Additionally, we are working to prevent iatrogenic opioid dependence after surgery. I see the devastating impact the prescription opioid crisis has on patients and families, and this work provides a rewarding and humbling opportunity to change clinical practice and to benefit individuals as well as populations.
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Julia Schoen
Editor, MJM
Class of 2018
Julia is a 4th year medical student at Michigan and member of the MJM editorial committee with a MS in Environmental Engineering. She is currently studying the impact of hospital wastewater on the epidemiology of antibiotic resistance genes with researchers in the Department of Infectious Disease and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The goals of her research are to determine whether antibiotics in hospital wastewater contribute to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria in the environment and, if so, what interventions can hospitals and practitioners use to mitigate this spread.
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Todd Jaffe
Editor, MJM
Class of 2018
Hey everyone - my name is Todd Jaffe, and I am 4th year medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School. My main research interests are in the intersection between implementation of new technologies and patient safety. I am also interested in improving the value of new healthcare initiatives and the impact of social media in improving collaboration among healthcare professionals. Specifically, my research has focused on how surgeons learn and implement new technologies and how improved surgical quality can reduce overall costs of care. I have also collaborated with other medical students to enhance how patients provide feedback, which was actually utilized by multiple clinics in the hospital. The resources available to medical students at U of M are fantastic and are great for my diverse set of interests!
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Joey Linzey
Co-Editor-in-Chief, MJM
Class of 2018
Currently, I have two major research concentrations. The first focuses on clinical outcomes associated with neurosurgical procedures. We are examining outcomes that are directly related to the operation as well as outcomes indirectly related to the procedure (i.e. start time of surgery, number of operations a surgeon has performed previously to the current operation, etc). In addition, we are examining the socioeconomic sequelae from emergent neurosurgical operations by analyzing the patient population that immediately enters comfort care or passes away following emergent operations. My second research concentration deals with creating an evidence-based algorithm to delineate the optimal targeted drug therapy to administer to a patient based on the genomic characteristics of their brain tumor and the drug's ability to penetrate the blood brain barrier. This algorithm is currently being programmed into a web-based application to allow neuro-oncology centers around the United States to utilize the algorithm to help inform their clinical judgement when making pharmaceutical choices.
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